Professional Remodeler Experience Profile (PREP)

PREP Candidate Information Guide

The Professional Remodeler Experience Profile (PREP) is a multiple-choice assessment with 150 questions that touch all aspects of the remodeling business. The PREP is the first step toward earning the Certified Graduate Remodeler (CGR) designation, which emphasizes business management skills as the key to a professional remodeling operation.

About the CGR. Certified Graduate Remodelers meet prescribed standards of business practice, demonstrate their mastery of project management, complete a comprehensive education curriculum (as determined by the results of the PREP) and pledge to uphold the program’s rigorous code of ethics.

Candidates must be licensed and/or insured contractors or remodelers who own, operate or supervise a remodeling business, hold a current and valid workers’ compensation certificate and have at least five years of experience in the industry. Applicants other than owners or general managers must submit a letter of sponsorship from their current employer explaining in detail why the applicant should be considered for the CGR designation.

The CGR Board of Governors provides oversight of the designation under the auspices of NAHB Remodelers.

The PREP is offered online and costs $95. It is a timed, three-hour assessment. We recommend that the assessment be taken from a desktop or laptop with a secure Internet connection. The assessment should not be attempted via a mobile device or tablet.

The assessment includes five sections.

  • Marketing and Advertising: researching, lead tracking and qualification, the sales process, budgeting and planning
  • Business Management: financial planning, budgeting, job cost and accounting.
  • Estimating, including pricing.
  • Contracts, Liability and Risk Management
  • Project Management, including site management and quality control.

How is the PREP scored? You do not pass or fail the PREP. Your answers are assessed to determine in what areas you would need more education to meet the knowledge criteria required to earn a CGR. Results are derived from the number of questions answered correctly and given a value of 0, 1, or 2 which is the number of courses required to complete the CGR educational requirements for that subject area. You are not penalized for guessing and are encouraged to answer all questions to the best of your ability.

What happens if I perform poorly on some parts of PREP? Your results report will indicate which courses and how many are required in a given subject area. You may be required to complete up to nine separate classes to achieve the educational requirements for the CGR designation.

How soon will I receive my results? Your results and information about next steps will be emailed to you within 48 hours of completing the online assessment.

What if I think there was an error in my assessment? You may request to have your assessment re-scored anytime within six months of your assessment date. This request must be made in writing to NAHB Education, Distribution Specialist, 1201 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005.

How do I arrange for special accommodations for PREP? Contact the NAHB Designation Helpline at 800-368-5242 x8154.

Once I complete the assessment, how do I earn and maintain my CGR designation? After successfully completing all the required courses, you will need to complete and remit the CGR Graduate Application. There are two graduation options:
  1. Premium (which includes a CGR plaque, a CGR lapel pin and access to valuable resources to help you promote and market your designation) is $145 for members and $218 for non-members.
  2. Standard (which includes a downloadable CGR certificate, in addition to access to valuable designation resources to help you promote and market your designation) is $75 for members and $110 for non-members.

If you have questions about the application, email CGRinfo@nahb.org.

To maintain the GGR designation:

  • Annual renewal fee: $55 for members and $83 for non-members
  • 12 hours of continuing education within three years which can be earned through:
    • Completing an NAHB Education course
    • Teach an NAHB Education course
    • Serve as a Subject Matter Expert for an NAHB Education course
    • Be an active member in a Builder or Remodeler 20 Club
    • Attend a national, regional or state trade show
    • Attend an education symposium or event (including audio and web seminars)
    • Attend a NAHB board meeting or chair a NAHB national committee
    • Earn a building industry-related professional designation
    • Complete a business management-related or building industry-related course or seminar conducted by a college, university or technical school.
    • Attend manufacturer product training: sponsored education on business or installation techniques, facility tours, fabrication process demonstrations or product demonstrations.

Taking the PREP

Before the Assessment. Answer the sample questions so that you get a better understanding of the types of questions asked and a general feeling of what the PREP is like. Be sure to read each question carefully so that you know exactly what is being asked. Each question has only one best answer.

  • Score the questions and find out how well you did in each of the five subject areas.
  • Look carefully at the areas in which you scored well and areas where you scored lowest. Identify any areas in the PREP in which you think you need more study to perform well.

On the Assessment Date

  1. Plan your time effectively. Work steadily during the profile. Do not let a question on which you are uncertain of the answer take up too much of your time. 
  2. Read the question carefully. This tells you what is being asked.
  3. Read the question a second time to be clear about what the question is asking.
  4. Be careful not to make assumptions. A common reason that candidates select a wrong answer is that they assume something that is not indicated in the question.
  5. Read all four answer choices completely and at least twice. In most cases, only one answer is correct. In a few questions, more than one answer is allowed. Incorrect answers usually contain common errors that may seem reasonable to a PREP candidate who does not fully understand the concept that is being assessed in the question. As you read each answer the second time, think to yourself whether it definitely does not answer what is being asked (a definite no), appears to answer what is being asked (a probable yes), or may answer what is being asked (a possible yes).